73% of brands admit their omnichannel customer journey could be more aligned

4 October, 22
Three in four senior marketers in the UK admit they are falling short in delivering a true omnichannel experience for shoppers, according to Mention Me’s Customer Advocacy Gap report.

Three in four senior marketers in the UK admit they are falling short in delivering a true omnichannel experience for shoppers, according to Mention Me’s Customer Advocacy Gap report.

The poll of 2,000 consumers and 500 marketing decision makers highlights the difference between brand and customer behaviour.

Commenting on the study, conducted by OnePoll, Andy Cockburn, Co-Founder and CEO of Mention Me, said: “Brands are clearly struggling to meet the demands of online and offline customer experience, risking increased costs and a loss of valuable customers. The landscape for marketers has shifted, making it harder than ever to gather valuable data and build meaningful strategies that deliver long-term value.”

The overwhelming majority of consumers (86%) shop both on and offline, demonstrating the rewards on offer for brands that deliver an exceptional omnichannel experience. However, almost one in five (18%) marketers lack confidence in their ability to do so.

The survey found that consumers across every demographic enjoy an equal mix of on and offline shopping, although more Gen Z and millennials prefer online (42%) compared to Baby Boomers and older, 31% of whom shop predominately in physical stores.

While most senior marketers (89%) are confident they know how to effectively manage customer data, just 11% of consumers are very likely to give personal details, such as their email address, before buying a product or service.

Cockburn added: “This highlights the importance of brands thinking innovatively about how they gather and use customer insights. Against a backdrop of fast-vanishing third party data, the race is on for brands to open channels that collect data directly from consumers.”

Asked what most influences buying behaviours, quality of product and price were ranked as the two biggest factors in choosing a product or service. Less than one in ten (8%) ranked customer experience as the most important. Referral marketing, meanwhile, was ranked as the most trusted channel for repeat purchases.

Cockburn added: “It may be jarring for marketers to hear, but customer experience is not the be all and end all. Loyalty can be built in many different ways, but it is clear that consumers place most trust in word of mouth from friends and family. We believe this study highlights where marketers should be placing most emphasis if they are to win more, better quality, customers.”

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